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Traditional Clothes of Bushehr

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Traditional Clothes of Bushehr

Bushehr province is a region in the margin of Persian Gulf. It is surrounded from its west and south sides by the gulf and therefore, it has a highly warm and humid weather. Khuzestan province is located in the north of Bushehr, Kohgiluyeh and Buyer Ahmad in the northeast, Fars in the east and Hormozgan in the southeast of it. Therefore, we can see various tribes live here the most important of them are Lors, Turks, Arabs, Qashqais, Tabrizis and Kurds. The province has a long history and the nomads come here from the adjacent provinces such as Fars and Khuzestan. Arabs have constituted a great part of Bushehr inhabitants. Therefore, although there is nothing to be called the distinctive traditional clothes of Bushehr, we can see many people worn the local clothes in our travel to this province who are either Arab or the nomads of the region. The only information about the unique clothing of Bushehr is that the men, especially those who were occupied with the business and so were rich and distinguished, wore an overall white or creamy clothing including the suit, socks, pants, shoes and shirt. Using long garment was also popular among the elders of the region. Arabs use Aba and Turban as their clothing and headwear and the locally produced Aba of this area are highly expensive and there is a high demand for it by the Arab Sheikhs because of its high quality. Arab women wear a long dress along with a black Aba, some pants made of printed cotton, and a shoes with the local name of Kowsh. Their dress is named Arabic dress that is highly decorated. They use a fine black scarf and cover their face with a fine fabric mask. Like in most of other southern provinces of Iran, women in Bushehr wear a Chador over all their clothes. Bushehr men wear a long dress named Dashdasheh (Thawb), the same dress popular among the Arabs. They put on a beret to keep their head from the heat and dust and the elders of the city wear an Aba over their clothes. Men also tighten a fabric around their waist named locally Languteh.