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Kushk-e Ardeshir in Bushehr

Kushk-e Ardeshir in Bushehr

Kushk-e Ardeshir in Bushehr

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08:08

21:08

Kushk-e Ardeshir, also known as the Palace of Ardeshir, is located in the Poshtpar hills, close to a village with the same name and has very pleasant weather. It is a part of the Eram region in the Dashtestan County, about one hundred and fifty kilometers east of the city Bushehr, and southeast of Kazerun. This ancient monument has remained from the reign of King Ardeshir the First, the founder of Sassanid dynasty. This is the reason there are many similarities between this palace and the Ardeshir Palace in Firuzabad, also a palace made by him.  Kushk-e Ardeshir is included in the national heritages list of Iran.

At the time of Achaemenid and also Sassanid dynasties, the Dashtestan County was a part of Fars province. This area has in it many historic monuments that belong to those times. There is no doubt that Goor Dokhtar, an ancient tomb from sixth century, and Tang-e Eram are the most important of them. Every once in a while, there are new discoveries in this area during which historical objects are announced to be found. For example, it was in 2016 that two urns were found during the diggings that were being carried out for renovation purposes related to a bridge in Poshtpar region.

The body of Kushk-e Ardeshir is made from stones and Sarooj, a certain type of water-resistant mortar. The plan of this palace is a Chalipa or cross. It was made in the style of Chahartaq with barrel vaults on top. Today, there are still two iwans in north and southeast sides. Adjacent to these iwans are rooms roofed with arches.

At the top of the instruction, remains a stone column that is speculated to have served as a place for setting up fire, sending signals, or may have been used as a guarding post. There is also a vaulted pathway, as long as six meters, that spreads from southeast to northwest. In 2011, due to high humidity and moisture and lack of attendance to this national monument, unfortunately, parts of this Sassanid building were destructed.


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